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To gain access to main plumbing we cut the Lower Level floor in the home so we can connect the ADU plumbing to the main in the house. Our carpenter removed the vinyl floor and underlayment. and opened up the exterior wall where the plumber roughed in and also the interior wall between the family room and the bathroom.

When we opened up the wall common to the bathroom we found the main plumbing was facing the opposite direction, which meant we would need to do one of 3 things:

  • Remove floor and trench all the way to the front of the home (down the hall, through the laundry room, and into the mech. room) This option would create extra cost and be very disruptive to the clients.
  • Introduce a sewage injector that would work to expel the waste from the ADU to the main drain in the house.¬†This would be additional cost and would need to be accessible for service and repair.

Finally, the option that we thought was the best course of action, and the option client chose:

  • Remove the toilet and sink in the lower level bath and cut up a few more square feet of tile and concrete to tie into the main drain. Although, this option also added additional cost and was disruptive, working with the client on this issue we agreed this was the best option.

Our goal was to solve the plumbing installation while keeping this process as minimally disruptive to the family as possible.

Trench in Lower Level from exterior wall to LL bath to bring plumbing to ADU.
The ADU plumbing must tie into the house main, so trenching to Lower Level bath and tying in there was the best option for our clients.
We removed the toilet and sink in the lower level bath and removed a couple square feet of tile and concrete to tie into the main drain. New tile will be installed, and sink and toilet put back in place.
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